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Humanities Ancient Greek Philosophy History of Philosophy Philosophy

Plato’s Divided Line

Plato’s Divided Line is a chart that both summarizes and illustrates Plato’s analogy of the divided line.

  • It summarizes the activities of thought and their objects, progressing from opinion (divided into conjecture, then belief) to knowledge (divided into reasoning, then perception) and, ultimately, to a kind of mystic communion with the form of the good as its object.
  • It illustrates with divisions of the chart that correspond to proportions of the line.
5321220-cls-0428-0347-plato-set-bcrx-20140301

PDF ver. 2014-03-01
1 p. 7.08 x 4.67″ .07 mb
5321220-cls-0428-0347-plato-set-bcrx-20140301

PDF version history:
2014-03-01: Updated SKU
2011-11-21: New release

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Categories
Humanities Ancient Greek Philosophy History of Philosophy Philosophy

Aristotle: Ways of Knowing, Categories, Causes, Golden Mean

The set of resources for Aristotle currently includes four charts combined in one PDF: Ways of Knowing, Categories, Causes, Golden Mean.

Aristotle’s Five Ways of Knowing

Chart identifying the intellectual virtues and their relation to the genus of systematic theology (i.e., the kind of discipline we are pursuing and how that discipline relates to others).

  1. Intelligentia
  2. Scientia
  3. Sapientia
  4. Prudentia
  5. Ars

Aristotle’s Ten Categories

Chart of Aristotle’s praedicamenta (Medieval term; cf. Grk., Katēgoriai; Lat., Categoriae): substance, quantity, quality, relation, place, time, position, state, action, affection.

  1. Types of predicate
  2. Highest of the genera
  3. Kinds of predication

Aristotle’s Four Causes

Illustration / chart differentiating the ways things come into existence:

  1. Material Cause
  2. Formal Cause
  3. Efficient Cause
  4. Final Cause

Aristotle’s Golden Mean

Chart based on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics: table of vices as excesses and deficiencies; of virtues as the golden mean between the two.

5321230-cls-0384-0322-aristotle-set-bcrx-20140301

PDF ver. 2014-03-01
4 pp. 7.08 x 4.67″, 4.67 x 7.08″ 1.6 mb
5321230-cls-0384-0322-aristotle-set-bcrx-20140301

PDF version history:
2014-03-01: Updated SKU; combined
2011-01-06: New release, Five Ways
2009-04-28: New release, Golden Mean
2009-04-25: New release, Ten Cat.
2008-09-18: New release, Four Causes

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Categories
Humanities History of Philosophy Philosophy Modern Philosophy

Immanuel Kant: Synthetic a priori and Twelve Categories

The set Immanuel Kant: Synthetic a priori and Twelve Categories focuses upon the two fundamental concepts formulated in Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason (Kritik der reinen Vernunft, p. 1781, 1787):

Kant’s Synthetic a priori

Chart illustrates the relationship between a posteriori and a priori propositions, on one axis, and analytic and synthetic propositions, on another, especially as this facilitates an understanding of Kant’s Synthetic a priori.

  • For Leibniz and others prior to Kant, all the propositions that we know only through experience (a posteriori) are synthetic and all synthetic propositions are only known through experience. All the propositions that we know self-evidently (a priori) are analytic.
  • Kant admits that propositions that we know only through experience are synthetic, but he does not admit that all synthetic propositions are only known through experience. Some synthetic propositions are known a priori: self-evidently — e.g., Kant’s categories (causality, etc.).

Kant’s Twelve Categories

Chart / illustration of Kant’s list of twelve categories, made up of four groups (‘moments’) of three categories each.

  • Quantity
    • Unity
    • Plurality
    • Totality
  • Quality
    • Reality
    • Negation
    • Limitation
  • Relation
    • Substance-Accident
    • Cause-Effect
    • Reciprocity
  • Modality
    • Possibility
    • Existence
    • Necessity
5323000-mod-1724-1804-kant-set-bcrx-20140301

Note the PDF’s relatively large, 2.6 mb, download size.

PDF ver. 2014-03-01
2 pp. 7.08 x 4.67, 4.67 x 7.08″ 2.6 mb (larger size)
5323000-mod-1724-1804-kant-set-bcrx-20140301

PDF version history:
2014-03-01: Updated SKU; combined
2011-09-17: Changes, Twelve Cat.
2010-07-19: New release, Twelve Cat.
2010-01-27: New release, Synthetic apriori

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Categories
Humanities History of Philosophy Philosophy Modern Philosophy

Philosophers and their Works (1650–1900)

The set of Philosophers and their Works (1650–1900) includes two resources: a timeline and a chart, together covering the primary Western philosophers and their works in the period from c. 1650 to 1900.

Timeline

  • Contains figures, works, and events found in corresponding chart (adds Galileo and Newton).
  • Twenty-six philosophers, listed by order of birth: from Francis Bacon (1561–1626) to Gottlob Frege (1848–1925):
    • b. 16th C.: Bacon, Galileo, Hobbes, Descartes
    • b. 17th C.: Pascal, Spinoza, Locke, Newton, Leibniz, Berkeley, Voltaire
    • b. 18th C.: Hume, Reid, Rousseau, Kant, Bentham, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, Schopenhauer
    • b. 19th C.: Mill, Kierkegaard, Peirce, James, Nietzsche, and Frege
  • Fifty-two of their works, listed in a separate section by publication dates: from Bacon’s Novum Organum (pub. 1620) to Friedrich Nietzsche’s (1844–1900) Ecce Homo (pub. 1908).
  • Ten key historical events for context
  • Horizontal format (9.50 x 7.08) with book icons

Chart

  • Contains figures, works, and events found in corresponding timeline (minus Galileo and Newton).
  • Twenty-four philosophers, listed by order of birth: from Francis Bacon (1561–1626) to Gottlob Frege (1848–1925):
    • b. 16th C.: Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes
    • b. 17th C.: Pascal, Spinoza, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Voltaire
    • b. 18th C.: Hume, Reid, Rousseau, Kant, Bentham, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, Schopenhauer
    • b. 19th C.: Mill, Kierkegaard, Peirce, James, Nietzsche, and Frege
  • Fifty-two of their works, listed in a separate section by publication dates: from Bacon’s Novum Organum (pub. 1620) to Friedrich Nietzsche’s (1844–1900) Ecce Homo (pub. 1908).
  • Ten key historical events for context.
  • Does not cover entire period sometimes designated “modern philosophy.” Except for Nietzsche and James, missing are the philosopher’s with works published in the early 20th century and those associated with analytic philosophy.
  • Same ten key historical events for context (red text)
  • Vertical, tabular format (7.08 x 9.50 in.) with original titles and English translations
5323000-mod-1650-1900-philosophers-works-set-bcrx-20140301

PDF ver. 2014-03-01
2 pp. 9.5 x 7.08, 7.08 x 9.5″ .16 mb
5323000-mod-1650-1900-philosophers-works-set-bcrx-20140301

PDF version history:
2014-03-01: Updated SKU
2010-06-22: Signif. changes
2010-04-30: New release

Philosophers and Works | End | To the top ↑

Categories
Humanities History of Philosophy Modern Philosophy Philosophy

Hegel’s Dialectical Method

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831; pub. 1801-1837)

The flowchart Hegel’s Dialectical Method illustrates the dialectic of Thesis-Antithesis-Synthesis and the progress in history toward the final self-consciousness of Absolute Spirit.

5323000-mod-1770-1831-hegel-set-bcrx-20140301

PDF ver. 2014-03-01
1 p. 4.67 x 7.08″ .67 mb
5323000-mod-1770-1831-hegel-set-bcrx-20140301

PDF version history:
2014-03-01: Updated SKU
2010-02-15: New release

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